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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)
by former president bill clinton. >> good morning. good morning. i want to begin by thanking governor romney for coming here today. this is really important. all of you who were there last night know if we cannot cooperate over these issues we cannot find it anywhere. this is really important. i thought i would introduce him by giving you an example of one personal experience we had together, when i passed legislation and signed it from congress, the model for me was a program based in boston called city year, which a lot of you know about. it is a great program. when i left the white house there was discussion about whether americorps would be defunded, the largest affiliate in the united states was city year, and mitt romney was on the board. i wrote him a letter saying we should continue this. i called him and i was out of the white house and i said, governor, i love city year. that is what americorps is all about. i hope you will save it. he urged the republican congress to continue to support city year, and they did. i just visited the program in south africa where the youth unemploymen
another. is >> eliot: when you look back at bill clinton who we look at as one of the great politicians of the past 30 or 40 years, his sister soldier moment was when he went to the base and said i disagree with you about this. it showed a certain force of character that he would say no. and romney has never done that. >> in a sense you have to do what both clinton and obama did, and to some reagan did as well, which is to push back your base, and while at the same time say i'm just going this for the camera, i'm your map. all of the great politicians know how to do that. they have to deal with their base in that way. >> eliot: president obama got significant criticism on the first couple of years of his first term on issues such as immigration and lesbian/gay issues as well and then suddenly there when he needed the base to come back he came out in support of same-sex marriage. and that solidified him as yes, once again he is our candidate. >> that's right. >> eliot: there you see him as the nimble politician, and i think that has carried him forward. >> as with b
by using waste water, i explained to mayor lee that a couple of years now, i worked with bill clinton on the isolation of public buildings and specifically schools so that every year, we could renovate 100 schools in paris and the children are in heated rooms but where we don't waste energy. these are subjects on which we have a lot of common ambition and where we'd like to exchange our dynamic efforts between san francisco and paris. but what would be a cooperation between san francisco and paris without culture? in san francisco, there's so much talent, so much genius, so much creation of cultural events that i want to open my doors of paris to them, [inaudible] that's an emblem that i created for the creative arts that come from new technology, i know there are fwraet creators in music and classic art, they are home in paris, that is where i will welcome them. you have beautiful dancers and the director of the [inaudible] is here with us today, there are dancers from san francisco that i would love to welcome at the [inaudible] vil in paris, but we too, we have talent, we have some
that give a bump at bill clinton's speech. does he just not want to admit it? or does he know that people will care or following research this? how does it make a statement in front of everyone? >> host: maria bartiromo. >> guest: we are in political season, right? it's all politics and so, you know, number one on the tax code, yes, that is what i just said. i agree with that. because a scene change over the last three years of her going to complain about people not paying their fair share, change the tax code. it is all legal. if a money manager can use whatever loopholes to lower tax expense, of course are going to do it. anyone but. it's not illegal. it is that they should or could do because the loopholes available to them. so again, i think you need to lower the corporate tax rate and broaden the base by eliminating loopholes so that everybody sort of on the same playing field. we haven't seen anybody do that. and the last three and a half years, we hear a lot of attacks on wealth, tax on business, those people who supposedly are paying their fair share and yet there's nothing anyone
time. >> cenk: former democratic president t bill clinton is incredibly popular. even mitt romney said this. >> we have learned in this election season by the way, it is that a few words from bill clinton can do a man a lot of good. [ laughter ] >> cenk: now my guy, george w. bush, he did a terrible job. you don't like him very much. you want to see a lukewarm endorsement. here is george bush. >> i crawled out of the swamp. eight years was awesome, and i was famous and powerful and i have no desire for fame and power anymore. i'm a supporter of mitt romney. i hope he does well. >> cenk: god every time i laugh when i see that guy. who says being president was awesome, i had power and fame. you know what happens even though they have been hiding from bush right now george w. bush more popular than mitt romney. when you are losing to w, you are in big trouble, mitt! that's why you find yourself in the middle of the ring >> gavin: welcome to nine show. millions of peep tao*epb agers have treasured the come can go of age story the perks of being a wall flower
but he never had a full congress that was republican. bill clinton did have a full congress that was republican but bill clinton was democrat. and you have fragmented government, george w. bush had a republican congress for four to eight years. george bush scarcely had the best domestic legislative accomplishment that could rival lyndon johnson or to be fair richard nixon. perhaps the 2012 elections will generate a unified government that will pass its preferred programs but it would be foolhardy, most observers at this time is the more or less maintenance of the status quo in which barack obama will continue to occupy the oval office as the republicans continue to patrol by reversed number of the house of representatives with the senate at this time being up for grabs. so we should be open for the possibility that the current election will fit the shakespearean description of sound and fury signifying nothing or very little with regard to domestic policy and that is what i am focusing on. perhaps not nothing. considered the conclusion of tom friedman's column on april 22nd
for the democratic convention, i thought that bill clinton made a mesmerizing speech, brilliant both in the rhetoric and the devil of the detail which was undeniable. all the fact checkers attacked him the next day and didn't find anything to attack him over. you then have barack obama the next night and i just didn't think it was nearly as good. i thought that was a bit of a problem even though the clinton effect can help him, the barack obama now has not got that sort of messianic feel he had four years ago. he's got to really raise his game in these debates. >> the great thing about this debate is that it gives him the chance to directly confront mitt romney on what his plans are. mitt romney has been talking generally about how he's going to save the country from the economic mess that the president has led us into. well, the reality is the stock market is booming, we've seen the jobs numbers turn around, the numbers today saying that there's net job creation takes away a big talking point and what is mitt romney going to do specifically, how is his tax plan going to be structured? he hasn't ans
than issues. this video is said to have hurt john kerry. this is said to have helped bill clinton. bill clinton. in the 1980 republican primary george bush had moment against ronald reagan, until in the debate in new hampshire, there was a moment where reagan looked strong. >> i am paying for this microphone. >> that moment helped change the campaign. >> some o some of them you can . >> read my lips. no new taxes. >> the difference between a hockey mom and a pit bull, lipstick. >> other ones, you got to depend on your candidate seizing a moment you didn't expect to happen. >> there you go again. >> most moments so far this election have been poorly phrased comments. >> if you've got a business, you didn't build that. somebody else made that happen. >> i like being able to fire people that provide services to me. >> they'll put y'all back in chains. >> the media call those gaffes, but often the media don't know. when ed musky lost the '072 primary because he looked like he teared up defending his wife, everyone said candidates can't career, because that's week, but then in 2008 hillary c
as a fact-checking community finding anything wrong with bill clinton's speech at the convention. bill clinton's speech made a compelling case for barack obama, a much stronger case than barack obama or his campaign has made for his reelection. and bill clinton's speech, with very few, very minor exceptions, passed the toughest of the fact checking tests. when he went on jon stewart we found out why. on jon stewart, he said he worked on that for three or four weeks and he consulted policy experts because he wanted to make sure he got it right. was that a compelling case, democrats? i think you think it was. was it factual? yes, it was. if you are going to be prepared to govern competently, can't you make the case for your election based on a factually defensible argument? and if you can't, why should we vote for you, even if you share our ideology, candidate? >> when you took the results of this survey and sat alone with them in your study there in philadelphia, and you looked at this gap, gulf, were you proud of the american people or not? >> when you look at the finding about the sup
in an independence that he is lagging ten points behind where bill clinton was. he is in terrible political say and for reasons i will review here shortly he is going to get worse before it gets better. i personally believe that 44 percent is a ceiling, not a floor. that is, inflated. my friend, great assistant to richard nixon, ronald reagan speech writer and adviser has long argued that there is no such thing as a bradley effect. the bradley effect is named for mayor tom bradley of los angeles when he ran against george deukmejian did not do as well in the final balloting is he had been doing in the polling. for years pundits have ascribe that to the brad the affected people are free to say they're not going to vote for african-american because they don't want to be up to the prejudice he they're talking anonymously to pollsters. and he has all the data, and i believe him, but i believe that even if the bradley effect was not true in 1982, latest here in 2012. there is a significant number of people, not for reasons related to race, but for reasons related to the nature of the democratic part
hd to barack obama? >> call bill clinton every morning. [ laughter ] >> jennifer: that's newt gingrich offering president obama some unsolicited advice. meanwhile the obama and romney campaigns are managing expectations. even the most ardent democrat would admit that president obama isn't the best debater. but according to beth myers . . . >> jennifer: and then president obama's top political advisor is just as glowing about mitt romney . . . they are so funny, my opponent he is abe lincoln and daniel webster all rolled into one. isn't that kind of weird hearing the campaign say such nice things about their opponents? believe me it's not going to last and it's all part of managing expectations before the debate. for more i'm joined by one of the country's foremost experts on the subject. samuel popkin who is a professor of political science at the university of san diego. he has worked on campaigns going back to the 1970s, and he is also the author of "the candidate." welcome back inside "the war room," profez or. >> it's a pleasure to be back with you gove
. and back-to-back conventions and many thought the democrats had a better convention. bill clinton's speech was the high point of the two conventions, but the verdict of the american people was that the democrats had a better convention. and it seems like that's about the time that these polls started opening up. gwen: walk us through the map, when we say battle ground states and jeff talked about nevada. there is a lot of states in between. what are the states you are charting? >> you are looking at florida, virginia, ohio. i think it's very telling that at this point, the romney campaign is -- and he was there in michigan or today and said he thought he would be competitive there and thought he would win. no ads so far up there for his campaign. if you look at one state that he seems to be doing well in, that's north carolina. obama won that by 14,000 votes. gwen: that's really narrow. >> a state like indiana, that was a state that obama won last time. romney will win that. everyone is surprised that all of these polls are pretty much saying obama is in command of the lead. chuck talked a
bill clinton get away with claiming that the republicans were the ones who deregulated and created the real estate and financial problems when he repealed glass-steagall in 1999. i was the underpinning and away the whole problem. i would say a sushi pointer to because in 10 short years, all the big banks, almost all of them went under. so i just wonder how he can get away with that. that is one of the hallmarks that gave the campaign a bump for bill clinton's speech. is he just not want to admit it? or does he just know that people won't care or following research this? how does you make that statement front of everyone? >> host: maria bartiromo. >> guest: we are in political season. it's political folk all, all politics. and so, number one on the tax code, yes, that is what i just said. i agree with that. what could have seen change over the last three years of her going to complain about people not paying their fair share, change the tax code. it is all legal. if the money manager can use whatever loopholes are available to him or her to lower their tax expense, of course they're
sounded like he was tired, and then of course, that debate with bill clinton and george herbert walker bush where he showed, he looked at his watch. so these are moments when people are really assessing your temperament, your body language, your demeanor. so it's a big night for both president obama as well as governor romney. >> did you hear him sigh? were you backstage like stop sighing? >> i heard it the first time. by the third time i pretended not to listen. but more importantly, once they put up that split screen, then you looked at he was rolling his eyes and of course, it was not a pretty moment. but we came back in the second debate. >> that's when the democrats started sighing, too, right after al gore. mitt romney has to demonstrate he's changed. there are a lot of voters in this country who are unsatisfied with barack obama. they think we could do better. they don't know that mitt romney is that change. neither of these guys has told us what the next four years could be like because of the changes they would bring. >> and that's i think another challenge that mitt romney ha
. medicaid. when bill clinton gave his talk at the democratic national convention he was incredibly shrewd because he did not talk about medicare. why did he not talk about medicare? medicare is not the real difference in terms of numbers between these two campaigns. it really is medicaid. when you look at medicaid and who benefits from medicaid, it is a lot of white, working-class folks, as well as underrepresented minority backgrounds. when you think about how republicans need to talk about it, i think that is that funny thing about ryan and ryanism. he has in some respects gotten it right in talking about how you want to talk about how we actually care about the safety net. it matters a lot to us and a free enterprise society, and a dynamic society we need to have this. it is not a side thing that we put a garnish on the salad, but it is an incredibly important part of making the system work. the problem is that -- ryan, the reason he excites activists is for other reasons. the way in which he sometimes uses a very apocalyptic language about the threats to free enterprise. i think that
an education. if the question -- maybe i'll get it wrong. >> reporter: then candidate bill clinton walking toward her. >> you know people who lost their jobs, lost their homes? >> well, yeah, uh-huh. >> well, i've been governor of a small state for 12 years. i'll tell you how it's affected me. in my state, when people lose their jobs, there's a good chance i'll know them by their names. when a factory closes, i know the people who ran it. >> reporter: just like that debate in '92, this, again, could be all about which one of them can connect with average problems, right? >> it becomes another "cares about you" moment and mitt romney has to show that he understands people's problems in this economy. >> reporter: and both the president and mitt romney trying to avoid their own past pitfalls. the president against hillary clinton. >> he's very likable. i agree with that. i don't think i'm that bad. >> you're likable enough, hillary. >> thank you. >> reporter: and there was romney's bet -- >> rick, i tell you what. 10,000 bucks? $10,000 bet? >> i'm not in the betting business. >> oh, okay, oka
to control spending, but i think you need a democrat, someone like bill clinton who can work with both parties. and that's not what we're getting right now. host: thank you very much, pat. our next call comes from david from minnesota on our line for independents. caller: yes, i think the ones that are at the top of the food chain are the lobbyists and the people that are buying our government out from underneath us, and i think we should have term limits and get rid of some of the people that have been in there for 100 years. and i think right now we've got the best government money can buy, and it's been bought by the lobbyists and the big corporations. there's also a saying, congress fiddled while the u.s. burned. and there's only 10% approval of congress right now. and these guys get too cozy with the lobbyists and the public should break up the logjam by voting all these old-timers out and getting rid of them. as far as the one-party system, hitler had a one-party system with the nazi party, and stalin had it with the communist party. i don't think that works out very well either.
-september, tied with bill clinton by the end of october, though clinton eventually won. a former clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african american, latino, and young people vote in 2012 that you had in 2008. >> obama campaign senior advisor david axelrod told fox, "public polls are widely variant in their sampling and methodology so it's hard to case when they all point in one direction they're all wrong, but we are planning for a close race as we always have." another democratic strategist offered this assessment -- >> the race isn't over. look, this thing can move back and forth three or four times between now and november 6th. if i'm romney, you try to create that momentum. he saw a sign to do it. >> of the eight presidential races in the past 10 where the leads were cut or flipped by the opponent, the average of the comebacks was roughly 5%. in some cases it was a debate that moved the needle. harris? >> mike, thank you of the let's go to syria where the u.n. is estimating more than 20
. that was 11.1%, and when bill clinton left off after ups and downs -- not downs below 11.1, but going up further, we ended the seeming ri at 11.-- century at 11.3%, and since that time, we had 15 million more people join the ranks of the poor this this country. i might say parenthetically, i bet everybody knows this, but the poverty line, so we have it in mind, is $19,000 now for a family of three. it's $23,000 for a family of four. not a very high income to have and a dollar above that and you're not poor anymore. up to 46 million, even in 2000, the same poverty rate that basically that we had in 1973, and then on the other hand, those 40 million people who were being helped who otherwise would be in poverty. how do those things fit together? that's really the heart of what this book is about so first of all, in terms of who those 46 million people are, just in a couple of words, and that is that most of them have work. most of them are working. a lot of them can't find full-time work. a lot of them are in low wage jobs which i'm going to talk about at greater length. it's not some diff
by a 1992 debate between george bush, bill clinton, and ross perot. then a 2000 debate with vice president al gore and george bush. past presidential debate tonight at 8:00 here on c-span. -- tonight at 7:00 here on cspan. >> cspan is not biased. there are no ads and that is arguably the biggest reason. the cspan video archives. it is one of the most historical are. i like to watch "washington journal," the house of representatives proceedings and c-span 2. >> cspan, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> retired military officials discussed the impact of childhood obesity and on health the options in school cafeterias related to national security. they talk about obesity and young adults and how it impacts enlistment in the military. this is half an hour. from the national press club. >> good afternoon, i am the national director for mission readiness, in nonprofit national security organization of over 300 retired generals and admirals who care deeply about the national security of this country. and to support the
president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to w but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. including
president bill clinton, the way he explained the economy and president obama's case for how he's handling the economy really seems to have had an impact. so i think those are some factors that are really playing into this lead. >> also starting out, ohio does have a lower unemployment rate than the national average. you have to factor that in as well. we know both candidates were campaigning there pretty hard in the buckeye state. let's take a listen to some of what happened. here it is. >> i have spent a lot of time in ohio, and i don't -- i don't meet a lot of victims. i see a lot of hard working ohioans. >> i believe in america and i believe in you. i believe you're going to help me win ohio, i'll tell you that. all right. >> so the president's showing up there a lot, but he also has the better ground game in ohio, right? >> right. well, i mean, he's been in ohio for five years and, you know, i mean, he had a very strong ground game here in '08 and it never really went away. so, i mean, this is something that his team's been working on for a long time. >> okay. both campaigns have said
not mentioned at all. >> it really is strange, you see the democrats, they trot out bill clinton at every opportunity, he is their party's superstar. and meanwhile, the gop, they hide g.w. in the back room like the crazy lost uncle. it's very odd. how long do you think that continues? >> well, you know, it took richard nixon a long time to come out of hiding. and i'm not sure that he ever came back and spoke at a convention. >> paul glastris, author of "elephant in the room," thank you so much for your time today. it sounds like a fascinating read. full disclosure here, i have only started it. they keep me pretty busy here, paul. hope to get around to the whole thing. >> hope you enjoy it. >> coming up, what beer you drink has to say about your politics. all of a sudden, the folks here on the floor have all perked up. >>> a little bit later, accusations politics in missouri have become unladylike. this is msnbc. [ male announcer ] let's say you need to take care of legal matters. wouldn't it be nice if there was an easier, less-expensive option than using a traditional lawyer? well, legal
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)